Conference Review: Search Solutions 2011

In November I attended the British Computer Society Information Retrieval Specialist Group’s annual Search Solutions conference, which brings together theoreticians and practitioners to discuss the latest advances in search. This is always a fascinating event, split into several sessions to cover the various aspects of search: web, enterprise and more.

The day started with a talk by John Tait on the challenges of patent search where different units are concerned – where for example a search for a plastic with a melting point of 200°C wouldn’t find a patent that uses °F or Kelvin. John presented a solution from max.recall, a plugin for Apache Solr that promises to solve this issue. We then heard from Lewis Crawford of the UK Web Archive on their very large index of 240m archived webpages – some great features were shown including a postcode-based browser. The system is based on Apache Solr and they are also using ‘big data’ projects such as Apache Hadoop – which by the sound of it they’re going to need as they’re expecting to be indexing a lot more websites in the future, up to 4 or 5 million. The third talk in this segment came from Toby Mostyn of Polecat on their MeaningMine social media monitoring system, again built on Solr (a theme was beginning to emerge!). MeaningMine implements an iterative query method, using a form of relevance feedback to help users contribute more useful query information.

Before lunch we heard from Ricardo Baeza-Yates of Yahoo! on moving beyond the ‘ten blue links’ model of web search, with some fascinating ideas around how we should consider a Web of objects rather than web pages. Gabriella Kazai of Microsoft Research followed, talking about how best to gather high-quality relevance judgements for testing search algorithms, using crowdsourcing systems such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Some good insights here as to how a high-quality task description can attract high-quality workers.

After lunch we heard from Marianne Sweeney with a refreshingly candid treatment of how best to tune enterprise search products that very rarely live up to expectations – I liked one of her main points that “the product is never what was used in the demo”. Matt Taylor from Funnelback followed with a brief overview of his company’s technology and some case studies.

The last section of the day featured Iain Fletcher of Search Technologies on the value of metadata and on their interesting new pipeline framework, Aspire. (As an aside, Iain has also joined the Pipelines meetup group I set up recently). Next up was Jared McGinnis of the Press Association on their work on Semantic News – it was good to see an openly available news ontology as a result. Ian Kegel of British Telecom came next with a talk about TV program recommendation systems, and we finished with Kristian Norling’s talk on a healthcare information system that he worked on before joining Findwise. We ended with a brief Fishbowl discussion which asked amongst other things what the main themes of the day had been – my own contribution being “everyone’s using Solr!”.

It’s rare to find quite so many search experts in one room, and the quality of discussions outside the talks was as high as the quality of the talks themselves – congratulations are due to the organisers for putting together such an interesting programme.

 

John Tait opening the fishbowl session at Search Solutions 2011
About Charlie Hull
Charlie Hull

Charlie Hull runs Flax, open source search specialists based in Cambridge, U.K. Flax build search applications based on open source software for clients worldwide.